Jhalak - Indian Cultural Festival!

A glimpse into Indian culture, food, music and dance

Jhalak Indian Cultural festival, Indian event with dance, music,art and kids workshops, Food stalls, Indian handicraft stall, 24 artists of Switzerland Jalwa - A musical production with Amitabh Reu and Stuti Aga Dance Company

Please buy your tickets for this event online on Ticketfrog

Jhalak is a 2-day extravaganza co-organized by the Stuti Aga Dance Company (SADC)  and the Indian Association of Greater Zurich (IAGZ)  which will showcase India at its best. Everything India is known and loved for – culture, food, music and dance, will be featured.

You can look forward to dance workshops in different styles by local instructors, food stalls serving cuisine from all corners of India and local entrepreneurs introducing you to their offerings!

On Saturday 25 August, Amitabh Reu, who enthralled audiences at Yaadon ki Baarat in October last year and the SADC will present JALWA, a spectacular music and dance show.

Believe us, you will not want to miss this! So block the dates in your calendar and book the tickets already! And make sure to pass the word around!

Various Workshops:

Dance: Bharatanatyam, Kathak, Bollywood, Indian Folk
Music: Singing, Tabla, Mridangam, Sitar
Yoga, Painting, Storytelling, Cooking, Kids activities

Food from various corners of India,Henna Art, Handicrafts, Make-up and many other attractions

JALWA – A spectacular Music and Dance show featuring Amitabh Reu and Stuti Aga Dance Company


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Tickets

Stall Access

FREE
  • Savour the tastes of India at a variety of food stalls

Single Workshop

CHF 10
  • Attend any 1 workshop with this ticket

JALWA

A musical evening
CHF 30
  • JALWA - a musical production of song and dance that will blow you away!

One Day Pass

CHF 30
  • Entry to all workshops on Saturday/Sunday

Jhalak Workshop Schedule


Saturday 25th August 2018

12:30 – 13:30
Mosaic by Rajani Battula
Musigstube
Bollywood by Trishna – Poonam Shyam
Kellersaal
BharataNatyam by Gayatri Muthukrishnan
Gymnastikraum
Meditation by Brahma Kumaries
Vorraum Obergeschoss
**
*
14:00 -15:00
Hindi Language by Neera Mallick
Musigstube
Kathak by Trishna – Poonam Shyam
Kellersaal
Yoga by Sanapurna
Gymnastikraum
Storytelling by Wonderkids
Vorraum Obergeschoss
Tamil Folk & Bollywood by Nilujan Siddharth Rajenthiran
Spiegelsaal
15:30 – 16:30
Chinese brush painting by Rajani Battula
Musigstube
Street Jazz by Juanita Rasiah
Kellersaal
Kathak by Raunak Upadhyay
Gymnastikraum
Vedic Maths by Wonderkids
Vorraum Obergeschoss
**
*
17:00 – 18:00
Painting by Sumana Roy Choudhury
Musigstube
Mridangam by Chidambaram Narayanan
Kellersaal
Bhangra by Meissoun
Gymnastikraum
Photography by Hemant Anand
Vorraum Obergeschoss
**
*

Sunday 26th August 2018

12:30 – 13:30
Watercolour painting byBrindarica Bose
Musigstube
Bollywood Fusion (hip hop) by Kiran Kishore
Kellersaal
BharataNatyam by Barbara Dejung
Gymnastikraum
Vedic chanting by Amit Sharma
Vorraum Obergeschoss
**
*
14:00 -15:00
**
*
Kathak by Anvita Pandey
Kellersaal
Dhrupad singing by Amit Sharma
Gymnastikraum
Kids painting by Wonder Kids
Vorraum Obergeschoss
Tabla by Manish Vyas
Spiegelsaal
15:30 – 16:30
Drawing and pencil shading by Brindarica Bose
Musigstube
Introduction of Sitar by Thomas Niggli
Kellersaal
Yoga by Gauri – Priscilla Brülhart
Gymnastikraum
Creative Kids dance by Wonderkids
Vorraum Obergeschoss
**
*
17:00 – 18:00
**
*
Kathak by Gauri – Priscilla Brülhart
Kellersaal
Oriental Fusion by Nadia Saba
Gymnastikraum
Harmonium Manish Vyas
Vorraum Obergeschoss
Photography by Hemant Anand
Spiegalsaal

Indian Classical Dance

Bharatanatyam, an Indian classical dance, combines rhythmic footwork, geometric patterns, graceful body movements and story telling to bring dance to life. I have been trained in this art form from a young age in the Kalakshetra tradition mainly under Guru Savithri Jaganath Rao and Guru Prof. M. R. Krishnamurthy. Forcing us to use every part of the body to convey the story and reach the audience, Bharatanatyam helps young dancers achieve concentration and dedication. Even as an experienced dancer, Bharatanatyam is uplifting and gives me a sense of joy in performing the rhythms and in conveying the emotions.

In this workshop, we will introduce basic steps and hand gestures required to depict a story. We will weave them together to create a short dance sequence.


Gayatri Muthukrishnan

Kathak, an Indian classical dance from North India, is an art of storytelling. It is rooted in “Natya Shastra”, going back almost 2000 years in history, originating in the temples of North India and then flourishing in Mughal courts. Stylistically, Kathak emphasizes on rhythmic footwork, delicate hand movements, subtle facial expressions, graceful stances and fast pirouettes.

In this workshop, we will explore a few simple yet technically interesting Kathak rhythms with footwork, spins and hand gestures, finally concluding with an Abhinaya (expressive) composition.


Singing & Musical Instruments

THE TABLA is regarded as the queen of drums and percussion instruments and is the most popular Indian rhythm instrument. It consists of two drums, the smaller drum is termed dayan and is made of wood and is played with the right hand. The larger deeper-pitched drum is made of metal and is known as bayan. Both drums have goat or cow skin covering. They have a black middle spot made of iron fillings, soot and gum which produces a characteristic bell-like sound when drummed.

. The combination of the two drums produces an incredible fullness and details of different rhythm structures and this fullness of expression is unmatched by any other rhythm instrument. No other percussion instrument has as many combination possibilites as tabla.


The sitar is a plucked stringed instrument used in Hindustani classical music. The instrument flourished under the Mughals and it is named after a Persian instrument called the setar (meaning three strings). It derives its distinctive timbre and resonance from sympathetic strings, bridge design, a long hollow neck and a gourd-shaped resonance chamber. Sitar became popularly known in the wider world through the works of Ravi Shankar. In the 1960s, a short-lived trend arose for the use of the sitar in Western popular music, with the instrument appearing on tracks by bands such as The Beatles, The Doors, The Rolling Stones and others.

Sitar, stringed instrument of the lute family that is popular in northern India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Typically measuring about 1.2 metres (4 feet) in length, the sitar has a deep pear-shaped gourd body; a long, wide, hollow wooden neck; both front and side tuning pegs; and 20 arched movable frets. Its strings are metal; there are usually five melody strings, one or two drone strings used to accentuate the rhythm or pulse, and as many as 13 sympathetic strings beneath the frets in the neck that are tuned to the notes of the raga (melodic framework of the performance)


The classical drum of South Indian music is the mridangam. This is an indispensable accompaniment in the concerts of both the vocal and instrumental music in south India. It is also known by the name of maddal or maddalam.The body of the mridangam is scooped out of a single block of wood.It is shaped like a barrel whose right head is a little smaller than the left.

In this workshop, we will be introduced to the Mridangam including construction and contemporary use, demonstration of mridangam playing, technique to play the mridangam, basic background of South Indian Classical Music, recordings of contemporary performances and hands on workshop with basic lessons


Chidambaram Narayanan

Dhrupad is Northindian oldclassical Raagmusic, its notes being set on a microtonal level. We will sing along with the Tanpura, a magical drone instrument, which will make it easy for us to begin. The harmony between voice and Tanpura is wonderfull to explore, even if you are singing only the base note. In this workshop we will touch the elements of melody, rhythm and taal/rhythmical cycle, as well as improvisation. Together we will undertake a mental-emotional journey of rare profoundness and beauty


Bollywood Folk & Fusion

Bollywood = Bombay + Hollywood

Simply put, Bollywood refers to the Indian film industry centered in Bombay (known today as Mumbai). It must be noted however that the Bombay film industry is the centre of the Hindi/Urdu language films.

No dance style typifies this emotional exuberance more than Bollywood, which fuses class with the mass, East with the West, ancient with the contemporary till such an extent that you can’t really define what a Bollywood dance style is, but you recognize it immediately once you see it.


The dance known as Bhangra is one of Punjab’s most popular dances and the name of the music style. Bhangra is done with classic style Punjabi dresses, and with instruments including a Dhool, Chimta, Algoza etc. It was originally danced during the harvest season, but now is a popular form of celebration at any time such as weddings and festivals. Bhangra is a very popular style of music and dance in Punjab, but is also very popular in the diaspora. It is a mixture of many steps like dhamaal, jutti, Fulka, Sialkoti, Dankare, Jugni, Mirzi, Fumnian. Other folk dance of Punjab like Jhummar, Sammi, are included in Bhangra.


Fusion is an improvised lead-follow approach to dancing to any style of music that does not have a strictly defined dance aesthetic. Just as music adopts, adapts to, and blends with various influences and styles, fusion accomplishes the same in the form of dance. It is a triad of connection between your movement and the music. Depending on the music and the dancers, fusion can mean creating a new dance style to unique music, or combining two or more established dance aesthetics into a single dance to reflect the sound of a song combining multiple influences.


Kiran Kishore

Bollywood Fusion(Hip Hop)

Nadia Saba

Oriental Fusion – Bellydance + Bollywood

Juanita Rasiah

Bollywood Fusion – Street Jazz

Yoga and Meditation

Yoga poses are great to strengthen and relax the body, however there’s a lot more to Yoga than that.

Derived from the Sankrit word ‘yuj’ which means ‘to unite or integrate’, yoga is a 5,000-year-old Indian body of knowledge. Yoga is all about harmonizing the body with the mind and breath through the means of various breathing exercises, yoga poses (asanas) and meditation.


Vedic Chanting is thr rythmically speaking or singing of Mantras. Vedic Stutis or Stotras are power in the form of sound. Through the chanting of the holy syllables in Sanskrit we tune our inner and open up to a deeper experience of life. In this workshop we learn not only a Mantra but we will also do some basic exercises of Pranayamyoga, the Yoga of the breathing. With the right breathing and chanting we will coax the magical energies of the Mantra!


Meditation is the journey inwards, a journey of self-discovery or, in fact, re-discovery. Meditation is time taken for quiet reflection and silence, away from the hustle and bustle of daily living. Taking time out enables us to come back to a centred place of being. In our modern world, the pace of life is growing ever faster and we are losing touch with our true inner peace and power. When we no longer feel grounded, we can experience ourselves pushed and pulled in many different directions. It is at this point that we start to experience stress and a feeling of being trapped. Gradually, over time, this feeling leads to illness and disease, as our mental, emotional and physical health is thrown out of balance.


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